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Hans Christian Andersen
Hans Christian Andersen
Biographical information

Born

April 2, 1805
(Died August 4, 1875, aged 70)

Gender

Male

Further information

Role in Frozen

Original inspiration

External links

Wikipedia

Hans Christian Andersen (April 2, 1805 - August 4, 1875) was a Danish author who wrote a wide range of material, such as poems and novels, but is mostly remembered for his fairy tales. One such tale, The Snow Queen, was published on December 21, 1844 as part of a collective work featuring alongside other stories. Even after his death, his stories continue to captivate readers and inspire new works, with The Snow Queen serving as the main source of inspiration for Disney's Frozen.

Biographical information

Hans Christian Andersen was born on April 2, 1805 in the town of Odense in Denmark[1] to Hans Andersen and Anne Marie Andersdatter.[2]

He quickly developed a love for theater, books, and stories; at the age of 14, he departed home to seek his own fortune in Copenhagen, where he attempted work as a choir boy, ballet dancer, and laborer. At age 17, Andersen met Jonas Collin, who was director of the Royal Danish Theater; feeling Andersen's works showed promise, Collin persuaded King Frederik VI to pay for his education. Andersen ultimately gained acceptance into the University of Copenhagen.

Trivia

  • Hans Christian Andersen shares the same first name as Prince Hans.
  • Andersen also wrote the original The Little Mermaid, which was also adapted into an animated feature by Walt Disney Animation Studios in 1989.

References

  1. The Hans Christian Andersen Center. A Short Chronology of HCA's Life. Retrieved on May 24, 2015.
  2. The Hans Christian Andersen Center. Family. Retrieved on May 24, 2015.

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